Handing in your notice

Congratulations on being offered your new position, now comes the often daunting task of handing in your notice.

Sometimes this stage of resigning can be more nerve-racking than the interview itself, especially if you’ve been with your present company for a long time.

Here are some Top Tips to guide you through this process:

Preparation

Once you’ve received your offer letter from your new company, you need to prepare to hand in your notice. Try not to feel guilty about resigning. Remember the reasons why you decided to leave and take comfort that those reasons are unlikely to change.

Write a ‘Letter of Resignation’

Keep this short and concise. Include the notice period you will serve and any outstanding pay, including: holiday pay, bonuses and expenses or commissions owed.

It is best practice to type this letter, not hand-write, and deliver the letter in person by arranging a meeting. If for any reason you’re going to email this letter save it as a PDF document first.

Don’t leave it on your desk for your boss or another colleague to find and don’t give it to them and go back to your desk without a conversation! This is one letter that will need to be discussed.

The Meeting

Arrange a meeting with your manager as soon as possible. If there is nowhere private at your place of work, suggest having a coffee somewhere or meeting after hours. Prepare what you are going to say and don’t forget to take your letter of resignation.

Keep the meeting professional and show your appreciation for your time spent with the company. Agree your leaving date and the date you will be paid for outstanding wages plus don’t forget to ask for a written reference.

The meeting should be very straightforward, especially if you show from the start that your mind is made up. If you show any doubt about your decision it will be picked up on, remain calm and confident.

Don’t let time drag

Companies are often shocked and upset to lose a good member of staff and they can be caught unaware when you hand in your notice. Try to remember however that your new company will be keen for you to join them and not to let your current employer drag out the leaving process for longer than needs be.

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